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  • Originally posted by MoValley John View Post
    As a lettuce, arugula sucks.
    I'll be your arugula baby...

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    • https://www.kmbc.com/article/health-...tion/34017744#

      Health experts say more evidence showing vitamin D important to surviving COVID-19

      KANSAS CITY, Mo. —

      People get vitamin D naturally from sunlight and certain foods, but health experts say three-fourths of people don’t get enough, and when you are vitamin D deficient, you're more susceptible to infections.

      Saint Luke's Health System cardiologist Dr. James O'Keefe, who studied the effects of vitamin D for years, says it makes sense to watch your levels during the COVID-19 outbreak.

      “If you're vitamin D deficient, you're more likely to come down with COVID,” O'Keefe said. “If you’re vitamin D deficient, especially if you're really deficient, you're much more likely to have a severe case.”

      O'Keefe said he takes vitamin D supplements himself and recommends them to his patients. He also said it's a good idea to get a blood test first to know exactly how much to take.

      “Most people need to take about 2000 units of vitamin D3 to keep their vitamin D levels in the normal range, so that's a reasonable thing to do for people these days,” he said.

      O’Keefe said some people have a higher risk of not getting enough vitamin D, especially those with dark skin and adults over age 65.
      I don't know about 2000 IU. That's 2.5x the RDA. 1000 should be protective. Less is more with supplementation in my book.

      P.S. Don't try and get your D3 from the sun. It won't work unless you expose large parts of your body for extended periods and then don't shower. That's going to bring about unintended consequences (like melanoma and your significant other asking you to sleep in the garage).

      Comment


      • https://www.kake.com/story/42629175/...ting-community

        Covid hits Wichita's radio broadcasting community

        WICHITA, Kan. (KAKE) -The COVID-19 pandemic has hit the Wichita radio community hard this last week, which has at least one popular DJ issuing a call to action to all of us.

        For the last week JJ Hayes of KFDI fame has been sharing his thoughts, worries and hopes with family, friends and fans on Facebook as he tries to help his wife, Michelle, in her battle against COVID-19.
        They think she caught it during a doctor’s visit. The biggest surprise, he said, was how quickly her case turned critical.

        “(It) wasn't even a full three days, she went from positive diagnosis to going onto a ventilator because it completely wrecked her lungs,” he explained. But then added that she’s doing better now. “She, as of Saturday, had opened her eyes. She's a bit more aware of her surroundings.”
        Former KFDI personality, and now Kechi mayor, “John Boy” Speer and his wife are also battling the virus. According to Facebook posts she is in the ICU at a local hospital. And Power 93.5’s Greg “The Hitman” Williams spent the weekend in the hospital with Covid. According to the station’s Facebook page, he went home on Monday.

        “They are facing some pretty big, scary challenges due to COVID-19,” Hayes said. “This is something. It's real. It's in the Wichita community. And I wish and pray people would take it more seriously.”
        “We're being ugly to one another. So, I'm going to advocate for kindness and love and caring. And, you know what, wear a mask,” Hayes said. “It's not the pre-existing condition that could possibly kill my wife. It's COVID-19.”

        He added, if you can’t or won’t wear a mask, at least be kind.

        Comment


        • https://www.cnn.com/2020/09/13/healt...ess/index.html

          Redefining Covid-19: Months after infection, patients report breathing difficulty, excessive fatigue

          It's been five months since Lucy Gahan contracted Covid-19, and her life still hasn't returned to normal.

          Gahan, a clinical psychologist in Shrewsbury, United Kingdom,hasn't been able to return to work.
          The disease causes what she calls "storms," disabling periods when she feels shortness of breath, numbness in her hands and feet and her heart rate shoots up from simple tasks. Even taking a shower is possible only during an occasional respite in symptoms.

          Before contracting the disease in early April, the mother of two ran three times a week and had a regular yoga routine.
          "I can only walk as far as the corner," she said. "In terms of running, I can't imagine when that will happen, if ever."
          She is one of thousands around the world for whom Covid-19 has turned into a chronic condition. Gahan and other Covid-19 "long haulers" feel they aren't yet getting recognition for an illness that has disabled them for months, with no end in sight.

          "I'm a clinical psychologist, and this is not anxiety," she said. "If doctors just say 'We don't know,' it's better than saying Covid symptoms only last two weeks."
          About three-quarters of those hospitalized for Covid-19 could become long haulers, according to a paper uploaded to the pre-print server medRxiv on August 14 without having yet been vetted by outside experts or accepted for publication.

          Researchers from the Academic Respiratory Unit of the North Bristol NHS Trust in the UK looked at 110 Covid-19 patients, whose illnesses required hospital stays for a median of five days between March 30 and June 3.

          Twelve weeks after patients were released from the hospital, 74% of them reported symptoms, including breathlessness and excessive fatigue.
          Despite these symptoms, however, 104 of the 110 patients in the study had normal basic blood test results, with just 12% showing an abnormal chest X-ray and 10% showing restrictive lung function through spirometry tests.

          The British Medical Journal released new guidance for health providers in August on how to treat long-haul Covid-19 patients, estimating that up to 10% of all people who have tested positive could develop a prolonged illness. The guidance includes specific blood tests to perform, possibly referring patients to pulmonary rehabilitation and having them use pulse oximetry at home to measure oxygen saturation in the blood.

          Results like these fly in the face of a narrative that took hold early in the pandemic, in which many medical professionals believed that the average Covid-19patient would be sick for a couple weeks, clear the virus and be fine afterward.
          Gahan and others with long-haul Covid-19 symptoms face a condition called postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome, which refers to a sharp rise in heart rate that occurs when moving from a reclining to standing position. The pull of gravity causes blood to pool in the legs. This condition can cause dizziness, lightheadedness and fainting.

          "Their heart rate goes up 50 to 75 points if they get up to get water," Greenspan said. "They have fast heart rates that don't have anything to do with what they're actually doing, that are not commensurate with their workload."
          Much more in the article. I recommend reading it.


          https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-020-02598-6

          The lasting misery of coronavirus long-haulers

          Months after infection with SARS-CoV-2, some people are still battling crushing fatigue, lung damage and other symptoms of ‘long COVID’.

          The lung scans were the first sign of trouble. In the early weeks of the coronavirus pandemic, clinical radiologist Ali Gholamrezanezhad began to notice that some people who had cleared their COVID-19 infection still had distinct signs of damage. “Unfortunately, sometimes the scar never goes away,” he says.

          Gholamrezanezhad, at the University of Southern California in Los Angeles, and his team started tracking patients in January using computed tomography (CT) scanning to study their lungs. They followed up on 33 of them more than a month later, and their as-yet-unpublished data suggest that more than one-third had tissue death that has led to visible scars. The team plans to follow the group for several years.

          These patients are likely to represent the worst-case scenario. Because most infected people do not end up in hospital, Gholamrezanezhad says the overall rate of such intermediate-term lung damage is likely to be much lower — his best guess is that it is less than 10%. Nevertheless, given that 28.2 million people are known to have been infected so far, and that the lungs are just one of the places that clinicians have detected damage, even that low percentage implies that hundreds of thousands of people are experiencing lasting health consequences.
          Evidence from people infected with other coronaviruses suggests that the damage will linger for some. A study3 published in February recorded long-term lung harm from SARS, which is caused by SARS-CoV-1. Between 2003 and 2018, Peixun Zhang at Peking University People’s Hospital in Beijing and his colleagues tracked the health of 71 people who had been hospitalized with SARS. Even after 15 years, 4.6% still had visible lesions on their lungs, and 38% had reduced diffusion capacity, meaning that their lungs were poor at transferring oxygen into the blood and removing carbon dioxide from it.

          COVID-19 often strikes the lungs first, but it is not simply a respiratory disease, and in many people, the lungs are not the worst-affected organ. In part, that’s because cells in many different locations harbour the ACE2 receptor that is the virus’s major target, but also because the infection can harm the immune system, which pervades the whole body.
          Just a little CB-approved info on outcomes other than death.

          My advice remains the same... avoid catching the insidious, alien bug.

          Comment


          • You still don’t understand statistical significance. Good thing your reality is driven by emotional experience or you’d be doing logical somersaults trying to keep up.
            Livin the dream

            Comment


            • Originally posted by wufan View Post
              You still don’t understand statistical significance. Good thing your reality is driven by emotional experience or you’d be doing logical somersaults trying to keep up.
              I sure hope I understand statistical significance or my entire way of life has been based on luck. That would be a trip. Money still spends the same I guess.

              And as far as the reality I live in: I share the same as the greatest medical minds of our day so I'm content with that.

              Comment


              • Since the posts say thousands, not tens or hundreds of thousands, and there are about 30 million who have contracted it worldwide, that makes it around 0.033% of the people who have had COVID have a chronic condition.

                It is also not a surprise that someone who catches a virus could have long term effect of catching that virus.
                Last edited by jdmee; 4 weeks ago.

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                • Now looking at the next numbers in your post. 74% of patients who were hospitalized around 5 days.... Using CDC numbers for all hospitalizations, your scary scenario would end up being at most 0.1% of the cases.

                  I could go on but I think we will see that yes there are scary outcomes, but they are not a significant number of cases.

                  Comment


                  • Originally posted by jdmee View Post
                    yes there are scary outcomes, but they are not a significant number of cases.
                    Now, you are not meeting Democrat, and the support of their media who has goals and outcomes for an electorate who builds their lives around fear and anxieties.

                    Comment


                    • "In God we trust, all others must bring data." - W. Edwards Deming

                      Comment


                      • Originally posted by Kel Varnsen View Post
                        Yep. Their scare tactics are so completely obvious to anyone who can use logic and has any semblance of a functioning brain and thought process.

                        Comment


                        • Originally posted by jdmee View Post
                          Since the posts say thousands, not tens or hundreds of thousands, and there are about 30 million who have contracted it worldwide, that makes it around 0.033% of the people who have had COVID have a chronic condition.

                          It is also not a surprise that someone who catches a virus could have long term effect of catching that virus.
                          Are you being incoherent on purpose?

                          Let's go over the data again shall we? Because I'm a patient man. I will quote the smallest amount of info possible requiring less focus and hopefully enhancing comprehension.

                          given that 28.2 million people are known to have been infected so far, and that the lungs are just one of the places that clinicians have detected damage, even that low percentage implies that hundreds of thousands of people are experiencing lasting health consequences.
                          That's HUNDREDS of thousands.

                          People with more severe infections might experience long-term damage not just in their lungs, but in their heart, immune system, brain and elsewhere. Evidence from previous coronavirus outbreaks, especially the severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) epidemic, suggests that these effects can last for years.
                          Past SARS infections (2002-2004) give us another possible viewpoint with ample amounts of history post-recovery.

                          And although in some cases the most severe infections also cause the worst long-term impacts, even mild cases can have life-changing effects — notably a lingering malaise similar to chronic fatigue syndrome.
                          Severe Coronavirus infections correlate to more severe long-term impacts, even mild cases (not requiring hospitalization) can have indeterminate lingering and "life-changing" effects.

                          The obvious place to check for long-term harm is in the lungs, because COVID-19 begins as a respiratory infection. Few peer-reviewed studies exploring lasting lung damage have been published. Gholamrezanezhad’s team analysed lung CT images of 919 patients from published studies1, and found that the lower lobes of the lungs are the most frequently damaged. The scans were riddled with opaque patches that indicate inflammation, that might make it difficult to breathe during sustained exercise. Visible damage normally reduced after two weeks1. An Austrian study also found that lung damage lessened with time: 88% of participants had visible damage 6 weeks after being discharged from hospital, but by 12 weeks, this number had fallen to 56%
                          This says, a healing body heals. But it takes time and healing doesn't always mean a total cessation of symptoms. After 3 months, 56% of a 919 patient sample still had visible damage.

                          Symptoms might take a long time to fade; a study2 posted on the preprint server medRxiv in August followed up on people who had been hospitalized, and found that even a month after being discharged, more than 70% were reporting shortness of breath and 13.5% were still using oxygen at home.

                          Evidence from people infected with other coronaviruses suggests that the damage will linger for some. A study3 published in February recorded long-term lung harm from SARS, which is caused by SARS-CoV-1. Between 2003 and 2018, Peixun Zhang at Peking University People’s Hospital in Beijing and his colleagues tracked the health of 71 people who had been hospitalized with SARS. Even after 15 years, 4.6% still had visible lesions on their lungs, and 38% had reduced diffusion capacity, meaning that their lungs were poor at transferring oxygen into the blood and removing carbon dioxide from it.
                          SARS-CoV-1, a genetic cousin to SARS-CoV-2, (but still a slightly different animal) caused 38% of a group of 71 previously hospitalized patients to still have reduced lung function after 15 years. That could be called permanent for all intents and purposes.

                          An over-reactive immune system can lead to inflammation, and one particularly susceptible organ is the heart. During the acute phase of COVID-19, about one-third of patients show cardiovascular symptoms, says Mao Chen, a cardiologist at Sichuan University in Chengdu, China. “It’s absolutely one of the short-term consequences.”

                          One such symptom is cardiomyopathy, in which the muscles of the heart become stretched, stiff or thickened, affecting the heart’s ability to pump blood. Some patients also have pulmonary thrombosis, in which a clot blocks a blood vessel in the lungs. The virus can also injure the wider circulatory system, for instance, by infecting the cells lining blood vessels5.
                          One third of an indeterminate number of China patients with an acute incidence of Covid show cardiovascular symptoms.

                          One of the most insidious long-term effects of COVID-19 is its least understood: severe fatigue. Over the past nine months, an increasing number of people have reported crippling exhaustion and malaise after having the virus. Support groups on sites such as Facebook host thousands of members, who sometimes call themselves “long-haulers”. They struggle to get out of bed, or to work for more than a few minutes or hours at a time. One study7 of 143 people with COVID-19 discharged from a hospital in Rome found that 53% had reported fatigue and 43% had shortness of breath an average of 2 months after their symptoms started. A study of patients in China showed that 25% had abnormal lung function after 3 months, and that 16% were still fatigued8.
                          Over half of a group of 143 Romans were still fatigued and huffing and puffing 2 mos after symptom onset. In China 25% had abnormal lung function after 3 mos.

                          The situation is clearer for people who have been severely ill with COVID-19, especially those who ended up on ventilators, says Chertow. In the worst cases, patients experience injury to muscles or the nerves that supply them, and often face “a really long-fought battle on the order of months or up to years” to regain their previous health and fitness, he says. He and his colleagues are now recruiting people with COVID-19 from across the severity spectrum for a long-term follow-up study, assessing their brains, lungs, hearts, kidneys and inflammation responses while they are acutely ill, then during recovery a few weeks later, and again after 6–12 months
                          The worse your battle, the longer you have to recover (from months to years); ie, death is not the only bad Covid outcome.

                          Once again, there is evidence from SARS that coronavirus infection can cause long-term fatigue. In 2011, Harvey Moldofsky and John Patcai at the University of Toronto in Canada described 22 people with SARS, all of whom remained unable to work 13–36 months after infection10. Compared with matched controls, they had persistent fatigue, muscle pain, depression and disrupted sleep. Another study11, published in 2009, tracked people with SARS for 4 years and found that 40% had chronic fatigue. Many were unemployed and had experienced social stigmatization.

                          It is not clear how viruses might do this damage, but a 2017 review12 of the literature on chronic fatigue syndrome found that many patients have persistent low-level inflammation, possibly triggered by infection.
                          SARS 1 studies indicate numerous long-term, debilitating complications from infection that may be difficult to diagnose by a physician.

                          But the answers will not come quickly. “The problem is,” says Gholamrezanezhad, “to assess long-term consequences, the only thing you need is time.”
                          A novel virus with an undetermined long-term risk. The only rational play is to avoid. Therefore my advice remains the same: Limit your exposure; limit the spread; be smart!

                          There you go! That's the $1000 dollar spoon-fed interpretation for you sir. I do hope we can grow from this.

                          P.S. It's funny how a few people liked your post - which was mostly gibberish. That says a couple things: most importantly, it says that some are so in indoctrinated they'd happily pump their fists to garbage if it means they can continue to avoid the truth. It's a sadness.

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                          • Wanna go karaoke this weekend, Cold?

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                            • Originally posted by pinstripers View Post
                              Wanna go karaoke this weekend, Cold?
                              Your park or mine? The weather is great!

                              Comment


                              • Please tell me Cold what is a significant percentage? You don't need to post long winded articles, just a percentage.


                                Just some numbers for you.

                                30% of the world population do not have clean water.
                                10% of the world population is suffering from hunger.
                                Less than .5% had had Covid.
                                Last edited by jdmee; 4 weeks ago.

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