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Bob Gibson, Cardinal Baseball Great, Passes Away at Age 84

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  • Bob Gibson, Cardinal Baseball Great, Passes Away at Age 84

    Another icon and hero of my youth passes away in 2020. I really am ready to be done wiht this awful year. Bob Gibson passed after battling pancreatic cancer over the past year.

    A man who actually did change the game of baseball as a result of his dominance.

    Gibson’s death came on the 52nd anniversary of perhaps his greatest game, a record 17-strikeout performance in Game 1 of the 1968 World Series.

    They Changed the Rules of Baseball Because of Him — Why Bob Gibson was an All Time Great

    https://www.stltoday.com/sports/baseball/professional/cardinals-hall-of-famer-bob-gibson-dies-at-84-after-bout-with-cancer/article_90a0dff7-bee3-5a81-9eb0-91663f29fb4d.html

    May he rest in peace.
    Last edited by 1972Shocker; 2 weeks ago.

  • #2
    There was the time Gibson's Cardinals were playing the Padres in San Diego when Lou Brock, who died three weeks ago, was hit by a pitch. Brock started laughing as he walked to first, and the Padres first baseman asked what was so funny.
    “Ya'll forgot who we got pitching tomorrow,’’ Brock said.
    The next day, home plate umpire Lee Weyer, aware of the trouble coming, warned Gibson before he took the mound and said there would be $50 fines if he retaliated by hitting players.
    “Well, get ready,’’ Gibson said, “because I’m going to be spending a lot of 50s.’’
    Gibson drilled the first two Padres batters, induced a double play, struck out the next batter to end the inning and glared at the Padres’ dugout.
    The Padres never intentionally threw at another Cardinals player as long as Gibson was in uniform.

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    • #3

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      • #4
        Originally posted by 1972Shocker View Post
        Another icon and hero of my youth passes away in 2020. I really am ready to be done wiht this awful year. Bob Gibson passed after battling pancreatic cancer over the past year.

        A man who actually did change the game of baseball as a result of his dominance.

        Gibson’s death came on the 52nd anniversary of perhaps his greatest game, a record 17-strikeout performance in Game 1 of the 1968 World Series.

        They Changed the Rules of Baseball Because of Him — Why Bob Gibson was an All Time Great

        https://www.stltoday.com/sports/baseball/professional/cardinals-hall-of-famer-bob-gibson-dies-at-84-after-bout-with-cancer/article_90a0dff7-bee3-5a81-9eb0-91663f29fb4d.html

        May he rest in peace.
        Drysdale was a lot like Gibson. I would say not quite as good a pitcher, but he had a lot of the same attributes, including throwing at people.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by revenge_of_shocka_khan View Post

          Drysdale was a lot like Gibson. I would say not quite as good a pitcher, but he had a lot of the same attributes, including throwing at people.
          While Gibson was intimidating, he had 102 HBPs over 17 years. That almost pales to Drysdale's 154 HBPs over 14 years (and 450 fewer innings).

          Interesting side fact: A hitter was just as likely to get HBP from Gibson as they were from Greg Maddox. I'll give you Gibson's pitch probably hurt a lot more.

          On the other side of the ledger, Sandy Koufax, who once lead the league in wild pitches, only hit 18 batters over his 2324 innings.
          Last edited by ShockTalk; 2 weeks ago. Reason: typing errors

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          • #6
            Originally posted by revenge_of_shocka_khan View Post

            Drysdale was a lot like Gibson. I would say not quite as good a pitcher, but he had a lot of the same attributes, including throwing at people.
            Bob Gibson will always be one of my favorites athletes...

            Mr. "Drysdale" always seemed like such a nice guy...

            "You Just Want to Slap The #### Outta Some People"

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            • #7
              I don't quite remember the year, but Little Joe Morgan of the Houston Astros should have been Rookie of the Year. Instead it went to Jim Lefebvre of the Dodgers who couldn't carry Joe's jock. It was before cable, so the Yankees and the Dodgers had way more visibility and sportswriters. Rest in Peace Joe, a legit great player.

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              • #8
                Lou Brock, Bob Gibson, Whitey Ford, and now Joe Morgan. My goodness

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by pinstripers View Post
                  Lou Brock, Bob Gibson, Whitey Ford, and now Joe Morgan. My goodness
                  Can't leave out Tom Seaver and Al Kaline in that group.

                  Other players who had note worthy careers: Jim Wynn, Tony Taylor, Mike McCormick, Ron Perranoski, Bob Watson, Jay Johnstone, Claudell Washington, Tony Fernandez, Johnny Antonelli, and Don Larsen (well, known for 1 game anyway).

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