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Coaches speak about the transfer portal

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  • #31
    Originally posted by shoxrox89 View Post
    I see where y’all are coming from in terms of the importance of getting a free education but at the same time you have to look at it from these college students perspective, a lot of them only get a stipend that covers a certain amount for food, laundry and hygiene products, they barely have enough left to spend on any recreational things they want to go out and do.(I’m not talking about weed.)

    If you were given a god given talent like the athleticism these kids were blessed with you would want to make money off of it as well, some of these kids come from a not so financially great background so anyway they could help themselves and their family members as soon as possible would be a tremendous benefit, what benefit is having to study for a four year degree right now when my mom is struggling to pay the rent at home with my siblings living there this month? A lot of times these kids are getting paid under the table anyways so why not try and find a way to legitimize it? So should they work a part time job where they will make crumbs and it will interfere with their studying and training? Being a student athlete is a tough enough job as it is by its self.

    These kids put their bodies and careers on the line every game for a scholarship, these coaches make millions and get to decide when and where they want to coach with minimal gripes, if you think the ncaa isn’t making billions on just March madness alone, go look at the numbers.
    I get your point.

    Student Athlete=Victim
    Coach=Predator
    High Level Donor=Predator
    Medium Level Donor=Predator
    Low Level Donor=Predator
    University Administration, Students, Faculty, etc.=Predator
    Low Level Minor Sports Scholarship athletes=Predator
    City of Wichita=Predator

    Everyone lives off of the Full Scholarship Student Athlete who is the victim, and only receives a monthly stipend.

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    • #32


      I mean, if that’s how you chose to comprehend that whole synopsis that’s your problem, I guess.
      Hows my post? send me feedback at 1-800-f$%k-off

      Comment


      • #33
        Originally posted by WuDrWu View Post
        Not to be a racist asshole, but I'll bet you $1000 to $1 that the inevitable damage that will be done to a largely minority base of student athletes in the form of wasted educational opportunities and minimal professional athletic successes will eventually be blamed on while privilege and their desire to monetize their dark skinned subjects.

        Any takers?
        I'll take the bet. $100 for $100,000. Hell I don't even disagree with your premise. I just can't pass up those odds.

        Comment


        • #34
          Originally posted by Kel Varnsen View Post

          Billion dollar piece of the pie? Tell me where the NCAA keeps their Scrooge McDuck money bin.

          They are getting a college education for free. Plus top-notch sport-specific training, meals, books, gear, academic support, travel, and exposure that’s worth well over $100k per year if you’re at the elite schools, and approaching that at other D1 basketball schools. Not exactly peanuts.

          If an athlete doesn’t like it they are free to go elsewhere, like overseas or in the G League. There’s a reason why most kids (the majority of whom are African-American) choose college basketball.

          The value in college athletics is primarily because of the schools because the players change every two years. I didn’t become a WSU fan until I attended school at WSU. I don’t cheer for them because of the players. I cheer for the players because I went to the same school they represent.

          The hatred of the NCAA and the collegiate athletics model is a result of blind groupthink that prevents those who embrace it from engaging any of the complex issues in the matter.
          This post gets to the heart of the issue. Most athletic departments aren’t making much money regardless of the perceived “billions”.None of this is going to matter because the paying the players and transfer rules are going to reduce the interest and the money over the next few years. Greedy conference officials from the P5 think that the world will still care about them after they have pushed everyone else out and we will see if they are right. I know I only care about college sports because the Shocks are in the Galaxy. If that’s over then I will not click on sports websites any longer.

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          • #35
            Originally posted by Shock Top View Post

            For a lesser man, maybe
            Just gotta make sure that one testicle is packed like a grapefruit in a tube sock.
            When you believe in something, the only person that's gotta believe it is you. Everything else is for the birds.- LeVelle Moton
            Wichita is going to the rich side of town with a pack of matches and a five gallon tank of gasoline and try to burn everything to the ground

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            • #36
              Originally posted by shoxrox89 View Post

              I mean, if that’s how you chose to comprehend that whole synopsis that’s your problem, I guess.
              Think about what you said, and look at the list of people (below) that I mentioned. 99.9% of the people I mentioned, only get to say YEA. We are good, Virtually no one else (head coach excluded) gets rich off of the 13 WSU Scholarship basketball players. Not Softball, T/F athletes, baseball players, Women's BB, Volleyball, Donors, etc. get rich off of these players (in fact without the donors who pay a lot of money just to watch their basketball team, none of it exists). In fact, EVERYONE ON THIS LIST PAID THEIR OWN WAY TO COLLEGE, AND HAD TO BORROW MONEY AND PAY IT BACK. So go after Isaac Brown (in WSU's case, the only one who exploited his own athletes). Your viewpoint just doesn't hold any water that these players are exploited without anything, and to be honest, your woke viewpoint is idiotic, and illogical.

              I get your point.

              Student Athlete=Victim
              Coach=Predator
              High Level Donor=Predator
              Medium Level Donor=Predator
              Low Level Donor=Predator
              University Administration, Students, Faculty, etc.=Predator
              Low Level Minor Sports Scholarship athletes=Predator
              City of Wichita=Predator

              Everyone lives off of the Full Scholarship Student Athlete who is the victim, and only receives a monthly stipend.

              Comment


              • #37
                Originally posted by shoxrox89 View Post
                Well excuse all the black players for wanting a piece of the billion dollar pie that is college athletics and wanting financial freedom for their family’s and themselves.
                Short term gain vs long time earning. Very sad that this permeates our whole society.

                Comment


                • #38
                  I think you have to go back to the origin of athletics in colleges and why it started to understand where we are. I'm pretty sure athletics were started to be part of the educational experience. It was glorified Phys Ed. A way to get students moving and exercising their bodies. Over time it became about school spirit and following the team. As the educational apparatus grew, college sports became more like a business. We are so far from why it started. It almost makes you think it would be more honest at this point to just drop the whole premise of having them be students and just make them paid professionals representing the school. Not saying I'm advocating for that. I don't know what the answer is. Just that we are very far from the original intent of having sports in college.

                  Comment


                  • #39
                    Originally posted by WeWillShockU2 View Post

                    Short term gain vs long time earning. Very sad that this permeates our whole society.
                    Yup, society bought another lie. For those kids from impoverished circumstances we just cashed in their ability to make generational wealth for chump change.

                    Sometimes what makes intuitive sense is exactly the wrong thing to do.
                    Kung Wu say war not determine who is right, war determine who is left.

                    Comment


                    • #40
                      Originally posted by WuShockFan View Post
                      I think you have to go back to the origin of athletics in colleges and why it started to understand where we are. I'm pretty sure athletics were started to be part of the educational experience. It was glorified Phys Ed. A way to get students moving and exercising their bodies. Over time it became about school spirit and following the team. As the educational apparatus grew, college sports became more like a business. We are so far from why it started. It almost makes you think it would be more honest at this point to just drop the whole premise of having them be students and just make them paid professionals representing the school. Not saying I'm advocating for that. I don't know what the answer is. Just that we are very far from the original intent of having sports in college.
                      But they aren't pro quality. If I am being real, 99% of the kids I have observed at WSU over the past three decades aren't THAT good. They are semi-pro/foreign-pro good, but they weren't even that until they were seniors, for the most part.

                      I reject the idea that even 2% of the NCAA players are pro quality _right now_. A larger percent might have pro quality possibility, but that can still be a large chasm to cross for the vast majority of them.

                      And just for clarity, I consider a pro someone who can get paid playing long enough to make generational wealth. If you can't do that, you must have something else to fall back on that can provide that level of income. And if you aren't educated, that's going to be very tough.
                      Kung Wu say war not determine who is right, war determine who is left.

                      Comment


                      • #41
                        Originally posted by Kung Wu View Post

                        Yup, society bought another lie. For those kids from impoverished circumstances we just cashed in their ability to make generational wealth for chump change.

                        Sometimes what makes intuitive sense is exactly the wrong thing to do.
                        While I mostly agree, apparently college isn't as important in securing a career as it was 25 years ago. Maybe playing four years of ball, cashing in some righteous cash and applying that cash to a sustainable life as you work through an appreticeship in a trade is the way to go. I'm not advocating this, but first year aporentices make like 15-18/ hr. Journeyman electricians and plumbers can exceed $100,000 with overtime, no college needed.
                        There are three rules that I live by: never get less than twelve hours sleep; never play cards with a guy who has the same first name as a city; and never get involved with a woman with a tattoo of a dagger on her body. Now you stick to that, and everything else is cream cheese.

                        Comment


                        • #42
                          Originally posted by Kung Wu View Post

                          But they aren't pro quality. If I am being real, 99% of the kids I have observed at WSU over the past three decades aren't THAT good. They are semi-pro/foreign-pro good, but they weren't even that until they were seniors, for the most part.

                          I reject the idea that even 2% of the NCAA players are pro quality _right now_. A larger percent might have pro quality possibility, but that can still be a large chasm to cross for the vast majority of them.

                          And just for clarity, I consider a pro someone who can get paid playing long enough to make generational wealth. If you can't do that, you must have something else to fall back on that can provide that level of income. And if you aren't educated, that's going to be very tough.
                          You can't pizz in my Post Toasties. In my heart of hearts, I still feel generationally gifted to contribute to the pro game. I am still plotting my reality-based path to get there. I will keep you posted.

                          Comment


                          • #43
                            Originally posted by MoValley John View Post

                            While I mostly agree, apparently college isn't as important in securing a career as it was 25 years ago. Maybe playing four years of ball, cashing in some righteous cash and applying that cash to a sustainable life as you work through an appreticeship in a trade is the way to go. I'm not advocating this, but first year aporentices make like 15-18/ hr. Journeyman electricians and plumbers can exceed $100,000 with overtime, no college needed.
                            Sorry, but just because people don’t have to go to college to be successful, doesn’t apply to most athletes. Plumbers (Blue collar) aren’t coming from former Div. 1 athletes. For example, I can name a former WSU athlete who is working for the school board (Wichita) as a security guard. He doesn’t need a diploma, but it helped. He never would have had a chance to play pro, and if not for WSU, he wouldn’t have been hired. And many of our baseball, softball, T/F athletes who only receive small scholarships or walk on, are very good students (many on school honor roll) who are looking forward to their future career lives. Without 13 men’s basketball scholarships, there isn’t enough money in our athletics fund to fund their programs, thus, they wouldn’t be here without men’s basketball. That is true for many Division 1 schools.

                            Comment


                            • #44
                              Originally posted by Shockm View Post

                              Sorry, but just because people don’t have to go to college to be successful, doesn’t apply to most athletes. Plumbers (Blue collar) aren’t coming from former Div. 1 athletes. For example, I can name a former WSU athlete who is working for the school board (Wichita) as a security guard. He doesn’t need a diploma, but it helped. He never would have had a chance to play pro, and if not for WSU, he wouldn’t have been hired. And many of our baseball, softball, T/F athletes who only receive small scholarships or walk on, are very good students (many on school honor roll) who are looking forward to their future career lives. Without 13 men’s basketball scholarships, there isn’t enough money in our athletics fund to fund their programs, thus, they wouldn’t be here without men’s basketball. That is true for many Division 1 schools.
                              How can you say it doesn't apply to most athletes? Are athletes different from the general population? A tailback can be a plumber. A combo guard can learn to wire a house. They aren't different from anyone else. A player taking the cash, then gettin a job, is in a better financial position than most of those that geaduate high school and go straight to work. They are older, have more world experience, have dealt with unreal high expectations and more. And many of those athletes taking the cash still end their four years with a degree. At the end of the day, athletes that take the check and aren't employable, have only themself to blame.
                              There are three rules that I live by: never get less than twelve hours sleep; never play cards with a guy who has the same first name as a city; and never get involved with a woman with a tattoo of a dagger on her body. Now you stick to that, and everything else is cream cheese.

                              Comment


                              • #45
                                Originally posted by MoValley John View Post

                                How can you say it doesn't apply to most athletes? Are athletes different from the general population? A tailback can be a plumber. A combo guard can learn to wire a house. They aren't different from anyone else. A player taking the cash, then gettin a job, is in a better financial position than most of those that geaduate high school and go straight to work. They are older, have more world experience, have dealt with unreal high expectations and more. And many of those athletes taking the cash still end their four years with a degree. At the end of the day, athletes that take the check and aren't employable, have only themself to blame.
                                I was looking for a receptionist a few years back. One of the applicants had a degree from Texas tech. It's not unusual for college grads to seek employment in low paying jobs in Austin. But you never count on them to be long term employees. Anyway I hired this girl who had a basketball scholarship and graduated from Texas tech.
                                she was the worst hire I ever made. Couldn't spell above about 4th grade, after about a month she got very rude with clients.
                                I eventually fired her. When she took us to court for contested unemployment comp. I was delighted to see a black female judge who chewed her ass out for wasting her college. This judge told her that she was part of the poor conception of not only blacks, but black athletes in particular.
                                Needless to say, we won the case and she didn't get any unemployment checks, and the judge ordered all the unemployment that had been paid to her, be returned to the state.
                                God I loved that judge. It was a teaching moment.
                                Last edited by Atxshoxfan; January 23, 2022, 09:17 PM. Reason: Sp

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